Nations largest cross-laminated timber academic building is an icon of sustainability

The first and largest cross-laminated timber (CLT) academic building in the U.S. has opened at the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst. Designed by Leers Weinzapfel Associates, the multidisciplinary Design Building brings together 500 students and 50 faculty across four departments into a light-filled 87,000-square-foot space. As a beacon of sustainability, the building features energy-saving elements, such as chilled beams and radiant flooring, and targets LEED Gold certification.

Cross-laminated…

from Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://inhabitat.com/nations-largest-cross-laminated-timber-academic-building-is-an-icon-of-sustainability
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Fabulous multigenerational home allows owners to comfortably age in place

Practical yet playful, the Charles House is a multigenerational home designed with an eye for detail and sustainability in Kew, Australia. Austin Maynard Architects designed the spacious home for a family of five who wanted a home they could live in for at least 25 years. The home, which is adaptable to meet the needs of a growing extended family, is one of the architects’ most sustainable homes to date and features a solar array, bulk insulation, and double stud walls.

Unlike its “McMansion”…

from Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://inhabitat.com/fabulous-multigenerational-home-allows-owners-to-comfortably-age-in-place
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GEOTHERMAL HEATING AND COOLING PRESENTATION – East Greenbush, NY

There will be a presentation about Geothermal Energy for homes, businesses and municipalities on Wednesday, June 7th, 6:30 pm at First United Methodist Church at 1 Gilligan Road East Greenbush, NY. The event and parking are free and light refreshments will be available.

In the Northeast, most of us spend most of our fossil fuel money heating and cooling our homes. If we’re building a new home we can use passive solar designs and insulate our houses well.  If we’re working with existing homes we should first insulate our homes as best as we can. At the moment, the most practical way of heating our homes is through geothermal energy. We can use the constant temperature of the soil under us, which is at about 50 degrees Fahrenheit, to help us heat our homes. Mr. Ciovacco of Aztech Geothermal will explain what geothermal energy is, and how it can be used to heat and indeed, cool buildings. He will also talk about the costs and benefits of switching to geothermal energy as a heating and cooling source.

from Green Energy Times http://www.greenenergytimes.org/2017/05/22/geothermal-heating-and-cooling-presentation-east-greenbush-ny/
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Offshore Oil Well Leaked for Months, Public Kept in Dark for a Year

THIS COULD HAPPEN ANYWHERE THAT THERE IS OFFSHORE OIL

Australia’s oil regulator is refusing to disclose the location and the company behind a 10,500 liter leak of petroleum into the ocean last year.

An Australian offshore oil and gas well leaked continuously into surrounding waters for two months in 2016 but information about the discharge was only released this week in the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority’s (NOPSEMA) annual offshore performance report.

According to The Guardian, the report provided scant details about the spill, which was only found after a routine inspection. After the publication asked about the spill, NOPSEMA divulged that the leak went on for two months at a rate of about 175 liters a day.

A NOPSEMA spokesman explained that the leak was caused by seal degradation but refused to reveal the exact location of the spill, just that it happened in the North West Shelf—an extensive oil and gas region off the coast of Western Australia.

Click here to read the entire article.

 


 

from Green Energy Times http://www.greenenergytimes.org/2017/05/22/offshore-oil-well-leaked-for-months-public-kept-in-dark-for-a-year/
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Switzerland votes to ban nuclear power and invest in renewable energy

The country of Switzerland has officially taken the next steps to meet its goal of generating 4,400 gigawatt-hours (GWh) of renewable energy by 2020, and 11,400 GWh by 2035. Over the weekend, approximately 42% of the Swiss population turned up to vote in a national referendum. As Swiss Info reports, voters chose to endorse a new energy law that promotes renewable energy and bans nuclear power plants. This is the eighth time in recent history Swiss citizens have voted on the issue.

Though…

from Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://inhabitat.com/switzerland-votes-to-ban-nuclear-power-and-invest-in-renewable-energy
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Architect designs solar-powered research center to save dying Lake Chad

Lake Chad in Africa spanned over 770,000 square miles in 50,000 B.C., according to Cameroon-based architecture firm Hermann Kamte & Associates (HKA). But over the centuries it has shrunk, dwindling to a mere 1,544 square miles in 2001. HKA hopes to use architecture to regenerate the dying lake, in the form of a desalination and research center called The Forgotten – Dead or Alive.

from Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://inhabitat.com/architect-designs-solar-powered-research-center-to-save-dying-lake-chad
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New research suggests plants use sound to find water and survive

For years, certain farmers and plant enthusiasts have claimed that playing music to plants makes them grow better. Brushed off as pseudoscience in the past, it now seems research does, in fact, show that plants utilize the sounds of nature – everything from the buzzing of an insect to the sound of water rushing through a pipe – to find water and survive.
In a recent study conducted by Monica Gagliano, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Western Australia, pea seedlings were placed in…

from Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://inhabitat.com/new-research-suggests-plants-use-sound-to-find-water-and-survive
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